Professional fees – what are we really worth?

There have been so many changes in our industry since the halcyon days of the 80’s and 90’s. I well remember a day rate as a commercial & advertising photographer commanding £5000. How things have changed and clearly, from our perspective, not for the better! But as consulate professionals we do have a worth. Indeed we should be commanding respectable fees for our work. All to often I hear and see discussions with tales of woe describing just how much our fees have dwindled to across the board.

Weddings are a prime example. Fees in the thousands used to be commonplace but we are told that due to the advent of the smartphone that we simply cannot command such figures. But there are some that still do. Perhaps its a case of understanding your true value and holding your nerve. Much easier if you have a unique presence and style of course.

In portraiture I well remember fees in excess of £1,000.00 for a portrait sale. Wall portraiture was at a premium. Photographers simply wouldn’t sell loose prints, and as for giving away one’s captures (negatives now digital files) it was unheard of. Almost a capital offence linked to either giving away part of one’s soul or copyright. In either case a bad move that today has become commonplace.

To put things in some perspective and show that not every profession has  similarly suffered, a solicitor, and not a principal I might add, commands a fee of around £2,640.00 per day or an hourly rate of £330 Inc VAT. So perhaps it’s time to up our game and recognise our worth as an industry. I for one will be reviewing my fee structure for Mentoring, training and legal representation & conciliation services. Not everything in life, or our industry, should be for free.

 

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Sorry, I’ve been away too long!

Its been over four months since my last post and my mind has been diverted with completing several pivotal projects but from next week…it’s back to business as it should be. More posts, more information and more news as I progress on the next leg of my journey. Watch this space…

Professional Qualifications in Denmark with the dff

As I am constantly travelling and delivering education, training and mentoring of a global basis, I thought I’d give some thought in this post to the differences of delivery to the dff, the world’s second oldest organisation for professional photographers. So here goes….

A synopsis of the two different level workshops.

  1. Master
  2. Qualified Master

The Workshop for aspiring ’Masters’ (BIPP and MPA Licentiate equivalent) covers the minimum basic requirements to qualify as a dff “Master’ photographer. The key elements of camera craft, lighting, composition and posing (where appropriate in people photography) are examined and developed in a mixed theory/practical workshop. Demonstrations are given in posing and handling groups in particular. Simplistic but effective lighting techniques are demonstrated and discussed illustrating the better known and used lighting patterns. Individual appraisals are undertaken of each applicants work and in group format, planning, presentation and layout for a digital submission is introduced as another essential element for success.

The Workshop for aspiring ‘Qualified Masters’ (BIPP and MPA Associate equivalent) examines not only the more substantial requirements to achieve a higher level of qualification but also instils the need to understand and practice self appraisal in a constructively critical manner. This is not simply a ‘top up’ of the M workshop as it requires a fresh start by all candidates where there can be little or no reliance on a current and past portfolio. Attaining a higher degree of qualification requires a serious commitment and investment in your future. Increased standards of imaging and ethics undoubtedly result in a better client experience. There are obviously a few areas of common ground between all levels of qualification but these escalate exponentially as the levels and requirements rise. This is a dynamic workshop integrating discussions and planning sessions focussing on personal continuous professional development. Lateral thought will be encouraged and a better understanding of the importance and implications of one to one Mentoring discussed. Your trainer will also explain in detail the systematic approach to conceptualising, planning and executing a person project as the base of your qualification.

If you’re interested in progressing your professional qualifications or simply improving the standard of your imaging, contact me.

Painting with Light at The Tate Britain – Art and Photography from the Pre-Raphaelites to the modern age

This exhibition that goes back to the dawn of Photography and its relationship with artists, most particularly those of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, is well worth a visit. What struck me most was the inception of the age-old debate, “Is photography art?” that still rages today. Certainly in the professional world, the category of Fine Art Photography has often found itself to be a dumping ground for all those images produced that simply do not seem to fit in the other more traditional categories.

Curator Hope Kingsley, makes a most pertinent statement that I wholly concur with. “Photographs share a simple consonance with other works of visual art in the formal components of a picture – composition and framing, attention to areas of light and shadow, and image resolution in distinctness or diffusion.”

In my own work I have striven to produce images that to me are more art with a camera, where it is just another choice between a brush and a palette knife where my pigments, tones and textures are moved around my canvasses with the same dexterity had I chosen more traditional or accepted means of producing fine art. My gallery of finished pieces and studies to accompany my partner Kate’s second poetry collection and constitute a submission to the BIPP is all but complete. I have had a working title for some time but driven by a hunger for more research and thought into the justification of photography as just another manifestation of art has led me to finding another in a volume portraying “The tragedy of a Pre-Raphaelite Supermodel – Lizzie Siddall”*…

Ars Longa Vita Brevis – art endures, life is brief

*Lucinda Hawkesley – André Deutsch, Carlton Publishing Group 2004