Portfolio Reviews at Photography Live Dubai 2017

At the year’s Photography Live Dubai 4th-6th May Martin will be holding a series of Portfolio Reviews during the show. So, if you’re wanting an appraisal of your images from one of the very best in the world, here’s your chance. Whether it’s an opinion on your chances in competitions, awards or even qualifications, Martin Grahame-Dunn has helped literally thousands of photographers all over the world realise their potential. Martin first brought portfolio reviews to the UAE with HIPA and many photographers have enjoyed great success following his advice. Now you can book your one to one session with him at Photography Live Dubai. But remember, there are only 24 slots available over the three show days!

There is nothing better than a one to one portfolio review to discuss your work and your passion!

A 20 minute session costs only 200Dhs and is incredible value. To book your one to one session with Martin email him at: mgrahamedunn@mac.com

Professional fees – what are we really worth?

There have been so many changes in our industry since the halcyon days of the 80’s and 90’s. I well remember a day rate as a commercial & advertising photographer commanding £5000. How things have changed and clearly, from our perspective, not for the better! But as consulate professionals we do have a worth. Indeed we should be commanding respectable fees for our work. All to often I hear and see discussions with tales of woe describing just how much our fees have dwindled to across the board.

Weddings are a prime example. Fees in the thousands used to be commonplace but we are told that due to the advent of the smartphone that we simply cannot command such figures. But there are some that still do. Perhaps its a case of understanding your true value and holding your nerve. Much easier if you have a unique presence and style of course.

In portraiture I well remember fees in excess of £1,000.00 for a portrait sale. Wall portraiture was at a premium. Photographers simply wouldn’t sell loose prints, and as for giving away one’s captures (negatives now digital files) it was unheard of. Almost a capital offence linked to either giving away part of one’s soul or copyright. In either case a bad move that today has become commonplace.

To put things in some perspective and show that not every profession has  similarly suffered, a solicitor, and not a principal I might add, commands a fee of around £2,640.00 per day or an hourly rate of £330 Inc VAT. So perhaps it’s time to up our game and recognise our worth as an industry. I for one will be reviewing my fee structure for Mentoring, training and legal representation & conciliation services. Not everything in life, or our industry, should be for free.

 

The Photography of Fatma Fahmy – Egypt

First a quote from this young lady rationalising her photography and the motivation behind it.

“Photography is another world to me. It allows me to live different lives of different people. It allows me to stop moments in time by capturing them to show the world the beauty that possessed my heart and soul and make it last forever. I wish I could affect people’s lives with this magnificent art.”

Fatma Fahmy – Cairo, Egypt

For this post I have decided to review a number of images submitted to me last month. The collection are well crafted and composed showing a variety of content that adds credence to her statement. They are a combination of what in the west we would call ‘Street Photography’ and more controlled, observational portraiture.

"Eye Contact" by Fatma Fahmy

“Eye Contact” by Fatma Fahmy

This image entitled “Eye Contact” does exactly what it says. It directly engages with the viewer with a delightfully captured expression that shows the happiness of a child no mater what his domestic environment, social background, living conditions or wealth. Simplicity is golden here and one cannot fail to empathise with this little boy. If one of the tools of a photographer is to create images that contain a story, then the story of this child’s life is is to be written by the viewer based upon its content. In truth, the off centre composition is not particularly necessary and does not add power or dynamics. The subject could have been centrally placed for that matter as the viewer finds it virtually impossible to stray their gaze from those eyes that express a simple, joy of life.

"Fisherman's Net" by Fatma Fahmy

“Fisherman’s Net” by Fatma Fahmy

As a contrast, quite a lot of work has gone into this image, photographically with good control of depth of field, compositionally by careful subject placement and in post processing where the problems lie. My best advice to Fatma is ‘less is more’ and although this is a good composition, a clear storyline, convincingly engaged subject, the processing has left a few artefacts and issues that could easily be resolved. When such processing issues are visible they can detract from the all important content contained in the image, the subject themselves and the narrative.

Martin Grahame-Dunn 2016